UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations University of Idaho College of Natural Resources University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Image Map
Aug 082012
 

Lisette WaitsAssociate Professor
Fish & Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-7823
lwaits@uidaho.edu

 

 

Biography

Dr. Lisette Waits received a BS in Genetics from the University of Georgia and a PhD in Genetics from the University of Utah. Lisette’s research is focused on conservation genetics. More specifically her research encompasses landscape genetics, molecular ecology and molecular systematics of a variety of species including large carnivores like wolverines, gray wolves, cougars, red wolves, Andean bears, brown bears, jaguars as well as other species of conservation concern like pygmy rabbits, spotted frogs and sage grouse. more info

CRISSP Classes

(click on the link below for more information)

Wlf 540: Conservation Genetics

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

John "Jack" SullivanAssociate Professor of Systematic Biology
Biological Sciences

(208) 885-9049
jacks@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. “Jack” Sullivan received a PhD from the University of Conneticut. Jack’s research is focused on theoretical systematics and empirical rodent systematics. The three current major research foci in his lab are:

  • The application of decision theory to phylogeny estimation.
  • Ecosystem evolution, with particular emphasis on the mesic forest ecosystem in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Testing divergence with gene flow in speciation of western chipmunks (Tamias).

more info

CRISSP Research

The centrality of evolutionary biology to all aspects of life sciences, including ecology and conservation, has never been clearer. My research program integrates empirical and theoretic studies in several sub disciplines within evolutionary biology. This approach is synergistic; my research in phylogenetic theory greatly enhances my empirical research, whereas my empirical research focuses my theory research toward practical solutions to difficult problems in phylogeny estimation. Furthermore, this focus on both empirical and theoretical research encourages interdisciplinary collaboration, which I find extremely rewarding and which is central to my research.

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Mark SchwarzlaenderAssociate Professor for Entmology
Plant, Soil, and Entomological Sciences
CRISSP Co-Director

(2o8) 885-9319
markschw@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Mark Schwarzlaender received a MS and PhD in Biology from the University of Kiel in Germany. Mark conducts research on biological control of weeds, insect-plant interactions, quantitative impact of specialist herbivore insect species on individual host plant and host plant population level, combined influence of insect herbivore and plant competition on weeds as part of integrated weed management strategies, and non-target effects of biological control agents. Areas of expertise include host-specificity evaluation and bionomics of herbivore insects, and foreign exploration for biological control agents for weeds. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Kerry ReeseProfessor of Avian Biology
Department Head, Ecology and Conservation Biology
Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-6434
kreese@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Kerry Reese received a BS in Biology from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a MS in Wildlife from Clemson University, and a PhD in Wildlife from Utah State University. His research is focused on upland game bird ecology and management, nongame wildlife, and avian habitat relationships. Kerry’s current projects are focused on the population dynamics of the Sage Grouse. more info

CRISSP Classes

(click on the link below for more information)

Wlf 492: Wildlife Management

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Janet RachlowAssociate Professor of Wildlife Ecology
Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-9328
jrachlow@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Janet Rachlow received a BA in Biology from the University of Iowa, an MS in Wildlife Management from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Nevada Reno. Janet’s research is focused on mammalian ecology and conservation. More specifically, Janet and her students focus on relationships between animals and their habitats, especially in changing environments. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Tim PratherProfessor of Weed Ecology
Plant, Soil, and Entomological Sciences
Lambert Erikson Weed Diagnotic Laboratory

(208) 885-9246
tprather@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Tim Prather received a BS in Range Science, MS in Plant Science and a PhD in Plant Science from the University of Idaho. Tim’s research is focused on Weed Ecology. More specifically he studies invasion plant ecology, invasive plant detection with emphasis on remote sensing, and integrated pest management of weeds in pasture and wildland areas.

Tim also administers the Lambert Erickson Weed Diagnostic Laboratory that identifies, tracks and surveys for invasive plant species, provide technical and educational program support to Cooperative Weed Management Areas in Idaho, collaborate with county faculty on pasture and wildland projects. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Steve NovakAssociate Professor of Population Ecology
Biological Sciences
Boise State University

 

208-426-3548
snovak@boisestate.edu

Biography

Dr. Steve Novak received a BS in Environmental Science from Johnson State College, a MS in Plant Pathology from the University of Massachusetts, and a PhD in Botany from Washington State University. Steve’s research is focus on plant population ecology and evolutionary biology; investigations of the factors that influence the level and structure of genetic variation: introduction events, founder effects, gene flow, and mating systems; polyploid speciation and ecological consequences of polyploidy. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Beth NewinghamAssistant Professor in Restoration Ecology
Rangeland Ecology & Management

(208) 885-6538
beth@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Beth Newingham received a BS in biology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a PhD in also in biology from the University of Montana. Beth’s research focuses on post-fire natural recovery and restoration. She is particularly focused on the interface between the abiotic and biotic factors that structure plant communities and assist ecosystem function. Beth is interested in how these interactions change in response to fire, invasive species, global change and land management practices. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

George NewcombeAssociate Professor of Forest Pathology
Ecology & Conservation Biology
Forest Resources

(208) 885-5289
georgen@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. George Newcombe received a BS in Plant Science from McGill University in 1983 and a PhD in Botany from the University of Guelph in 1988. George’s research encompasses plant and forest pathology, and invasion biology. Specifically, his group is interested in the roles of fungi in plant communities. Photo in Beijing, September 2007, for the International Workshop on Biological Control of Invasive Species of Forest [Photo courtesy of Yilmaz Balci, University of Maryland]. more info

CRISSP Research
  1. Diagnosis of fungi that are new to North America or to the region. In 1992, George discovered for the first time in North America the Eurasian poplar leaf rust fungus, Melampsora larici-populina (Newcombe and Chastagner 1993). Since then, he has been a regular contributor to this element of invasion biology.
  2. Research on fungi that might protect native trees from exotic pathogens. With Beccy Ganley, a former PhD student, and Richard Sniezko, a colleague in the Forest Service, George discovered that selected endophytes might protect western white pine trees from the exotic disease, white pine blister rust. George and Richard are now using the same approach to see if endophyte inoculations of outplanted seedlings could make the difference in whitebark pine restoration. George is also attempting to use endophytes to protect hybrid popular plantations.
  3. Research on fungi that might be used against invasive plants. George has been researching selected endophytes that might work against invasive plants such as spotted knapweed, meadow hawkweed, and cheatgrass.
  4. Research on genes for resistance to exotic pathogens of plants. George has been conducting research in this area since getting involved in hybrid poplar research in 1991.
CRISSP Classes

FOR 531: Invasion Biology (for graduate students)
FOR 468: Forest and Plant Pathology (for senior undergraduate students)

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Christine MoffittProfessor of Fish Biology
Assistant Unit Leader
Idaho Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit
Fishery Resources

(208) 885-7047
cmoffitt@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Christine Moffitt received a BA in Biology from the University of California, MA in Biological Sciences from Smith College, and a PhD in Fisheries Biology from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Christine’s research is focused aquatic fish biology and invasive species in fisheries. She also specializes in invertebrates and how they interact on a generalized scale with spatial tools. more info

CRISSP Research

More specifically, research is currently being conducted on controlling and understanding the risks of New Zealand mudsnails with fish hatchery operations. In addition Christine evaluates the risks of invasive species with barrier removal in streams and rivers.

CRISSP Classes

(click on the link below for more information)

Fish 510: Advanced Fish Management

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

John MarshallProfessor of Forest Ecology
Forest Resources

(208) 885-6695
jdm@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. John Marshall received a BS and MS in Forestry from Michigan State University and a PhD in Forest Science from Oregon State University in Corvallis. John’s research is focused on tree physiology, ecosystem ecology, and stable isotope ratios. Examples of his current reseach projects include the differences in water sources among tree species in northern Idaho, water-use efficiency difference among provenances of western conifers, and the use of carbon isotopes in tree rings to detect physiological responses to increasing carbon dioxide.

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Ted KishaPlant Geneticist
USDA Agricultural Research Service Western Region Plant Introduction Station

(509) 335-6898
theodore.kisha@ars.usda.gov

 

Biography

Dr. Ted Kisha received a BA in Chemistry from Hiram College, a MS in Agronomy from Montana State University, and a PhD in Plant Breeding and Genetics from Michigan State University. Ted is the plant geneticist for the USDA ARS Western Region Plant Introduction Station which is part of the overall National Plant Germplasm system. Ted’s research focuses on using molecular markers to characterize the genetic diversity of accessions within his collection. More recently he has been analyzing populations from the Great basin of several native species, including Allium acuminatum and Lomatium dissectum and will continue on more species in the future. more info

CRISSP Research

Ted is currently working on research related to Lepidium papiliferum with Dr. Cort Anderson and Dr. Steve Bunting.

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Brian KennedyAssistant Professor of Fish Ecology
Fish & Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-5171
kennedy@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Brian Kennedy received a BA in Biological Sciences from Colgate University and a PhD in Ecology and Evolution from Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. Brian’s research is focused on bioenergetics and community ecology of streams, ecosystem controls on aquatic processes, and biochemical tracers in aquatic systems. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Jodi Johnson-MaynardAssociate Professor of Soil Science
Plant, Soil, and Entomological Sciences

(208) 885-9245
jmaynard@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Jodi Johnson-Maynard received a MS in Soil Science from the University of Idaho and a PhD in Soil and Water Sciences from the University of California, Riverside. Jodi’s research is focused on earthworm ecology, carbon and nitrogen cycling and soil-plant interactions. She also advises undergraduate and graduate students and teaches Soil 205, The Soil Ecosystem. For the past five years Jodi has served on the Idaho Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee, a group focused on outreach and education relating to carbon sequestration and credit trading. more info

CRISSP Research

Current research in our laboratory on native earthworms is directly related to CRISSP since it deals with small (extremely small) populations. Earthworm populations in the Palouse region are dominated by exotic species. Through some combination of land use change and competition with introduced species, native earthworms are rare and appear to occur in isolated patches. Further research is needed to better understand the ecology of native species and the factors that have contributed to their decline. Another area of interest in our laboratory is the co-evolution of plants and soils. The ability of some invasive plant species, a main focus of CRISSP, to alter soil conditions once they are established has been documented. Chemical and physical changes occurring in the soil after invasion may benefit the invasive plant. In parts of the Clearwater National Forest in Idaho bracken fern invades following timber harvest. Once bracken is established natural conifer regeneration is virtually non-existent. We have been studying the ability of bracken fern to alter soil chemical properties as a mechanism to explain the lack of secondary succession within these areas. Better knowledge of the role that soil plays in biological invasions may lead to better methods of predication and control.

CRISSP Classes

(click on the links below for more information)

Soil 205 – The Soil Ecosystem

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Hariet HinzHead Biological Weed Control Researcher
CABI Europe-Switzerland

+41 (0)32 4214872
h.hinz@cabi.org

 

Biography

Dr. Hariet Hinz received a diploma in horticulture and a MS in Pest Management from the Imperial College for Medicine, Science, and Technology in the United Kingdom. She then received her PhD in Biology/Ecology at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Hariet’s research focuses on the management and development of weed biologoical control research projects at CABI Europe – Switzerland. She is currently supervising 16 biological control research projects mainly for North America and conducts most of her field work in Europe. She studies the biology, ecology, host specificity and impact of herbivorous insects and the population biology of plants. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Charles HarrisProfessor of Environmental Management, Policy and Planning
Conservation Social Sciences

(208) 885-6314
charris@uidaho.edu

 

 

Biography

Dr. “Chuck” Harris received a BA in English Literature from Oberlin College, a MA in Natural Resource Management from Colorado State University and a PhD in Natural Reources from the University of Michigan. Chuck has been at the University of Idaho for over 20 years, where he has taught and conducted research on a wide variety of topics, including: the human dimensions of ecosystem management and restoration ecology; the impacts of resource management activities and policies on rural communities; social impact assessment and deliberative public input processes; resource management, policy, and planning; the organizational psychology of resource management; and natural resource tourism, impacts, and market analysis. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Dale GobleMargaret Wilson Schminke Distinguished Professor of Law
(208) 885-7976
gobled@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Dale Goble received a AB in philosophy from Columbia University and a JD from the University of Oregon. Professor Goble teaches natural resource law (including public land law and wildlife law), natural resource history, and torts. He has published numerous articles and essays and is the co-author of three books focusing on wildlife law. Since 2001, he has been an organizer of a multidisciplinary, multi-interest evaluation of the Endangered Species Act.

CRISSP Research

The most recent project related to CRISSP is the ESA @ 30 Project which is a multidisciplinary project with scientists, economists, policy analysts, and lawyers from different Universities to analyze and help interpret what recovery means in the Endangered Species Act so that the overarching goal of “conserving species” is achieved. The ESA @ 30 Project has entailed two national conferences, nearly a dozen smaller workshops, and a series of Regional Directors of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Nature Conservancy-Smith Fellows, and the Western Association of Fish and Game Administrators.

CRISSP Related Classes

(click on the link below for more information)

Law 937: Natural Resources Law and Legal History

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

John GaskinPest Management Research Unit Research Leader and Scientist
USDA Agricultural Research Service

 

(406) 433.9444
john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov

Biography

Dr. John Gaskin received a BS in Biology from University of California and a PhD in Evolutionary and Population Biology from Washington University in St. Louis and Missouri Botanical Gardens in Missouri. John’s research focuses on the systematics and population structure of invasive plants, particularly whitetop or hoarycress (Lepidium draba formerly Cardaria draba) and saltcedar (Tamarix spp.). The specific goals of this research are to are to find out which genotypes of these exotic plants are invading, where the genotypes originated from in Eurasia, which native and exotic species they are most closely related to, and where the invasive genotypes are distributed in the U.S. This information will be used to insure that all of the genetic diversity of these invasions will be present in tests of current and proposed biological control agents, and that all native plants closely related to the invasion will be included in host-specificity tests. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Edward GartonProfessor of Population Ecology
Fish & Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-7426
ogarton@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Edward Garton received a BA in Biology from Sanford University, and a MS and PhD in Ecology from the University of California, Davis. Edward’s research is focused on the dynamics and Management of Bird and Mammal Populations. Some of his research includes the impacts of the reintroduction of wolves on Yellowstone elk and deer populations, population ecology of Greater Sage Grouse and Trumpeter Swans, aerial census methods for elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and moose populations, bird predation on forest insect pests, and home range estimation. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Sanford EigenbrodeProfessor of Chemical Ecology
Plant, Soil, and Entomological Sciences

(208) 885-2972
sanforde@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Sanford Eigenbrode received a BS, MS and PhD from Cornell University. Sanford conducts research on chemical ecology of insects, plant-insect interactions, chemical and structural plant attributes affecting plant-insect and tritrophic interactions, insect behavior, plant surface waxes, with expertise in extraction and analysis of chemicals from plant tissues, scanning electron microscopy, host plant resistance, and integration of host plant resistance into pest management. Interests also include the effects of crop variety and management practice on arthropod communities in agroecosystems. Research in this area includes effects of tillage practices on ground-dwelling insect predators in wheat and pea and in the surrounding landscape. Similar questions are being addressed concerning ant communities in coffee systems in Costa Rica. These last two emphasis areas are part of a larger training and research project funded by NSF/IGERT at the University of Idaho and CATIE in Costa Rica. more info

CRISSP Classes

(click on the links below for more information)

Ent WS443: Insect Ecology
Ent ID-J445/ID-J549: Plant-Insect Interactions

 August 8, 2012
Aug 072012
 

Cook_196x208

Associate Professor of Natural Resource Entomology
Plant, Soils, and Entomological Sciences

 

 

(208) 885-2722
stephenc@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Stephen Cook received a BS in Environmental Biology from Heidelberg College, a MS in Entomology from Texas A&M University and a PhD in Entomology from North Caroling State University. Steve’s research is on Forest entomology with emphases on: Chemical and behavioral ecology of insect-tree interactions; Insect population and community dynamics; Impact of invasive species on forest community dynamics; Use of remotely-sensed data for detection and assessment of insect infestations and damage; Biological control of forest insects; Management of selected insect populations. For Steve, forest entomology represents the ideal combination of basic and applied research and Idaho represents an ideal location. Whether they are basic or applied questions, there are many facets of forest entomology that can be addressed within a short drive of Moscow. Currently, one of my primary areas of interest is in developing detection and management strategies for ‘pest’ species (including non-native forest insects such as Balsam Woolly Adelgid).

CRISSP Classes

(click on the links below for more information)

FOR 466: Forest Diseases and Insects

FOR 207: Sustainable Forestry

FOR 569: Advanced Forest Entomology

 August 7, 2012
Aug 072012
 

Kenneth CainAssociate Professor of Fish Pathology
Associate Director
Fishery Resources
Aquaculture Research Institute

 

(208) 885-7608
kcain@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Kenneth Cain received a BS and MS in Fish and Wildlife from Michigan State University and a PhD in Animal Sciences from Washington State University. Ken’s research is focused on fish health and pathology. More specifically his primary research projects address fish immunology, aquaculture vaccine development, host-pathogen interactions, the development of new disease diagnostic tools, and antigen characterization/identification. In addition, Ken works in the area of aquaculture development for new species and is currently collaborating with the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to develop captive rearing methods for Burbot (Lota lota). This species (a freshwater cod) is nearly extinct in Idaho and the methods developed at UI will be incorporated into a conservation aquaculture program to rehabilitate the remnant population in the Kootenai River. more info

CRISSP Research

A number of projects in my lab have investigated new and emerging diseases that create difficulties for species restoration. In some cases these pathogens can be considered invasive species if they are not endemic to this region. A good example of this is the parasite Myxobolus cerebralis, which causes whirling disease. The work that we are doing on vaccine development for coldwater disease also has implications for hatchery programs aimed at recovery of threatened steelhead and Coho salmon populations, as these species are very susceptible to this disease. Finally, the burbot program that has been ongoing since 2004 is directly related to CRISSP in that it is aimed at recovery of a small population in Idaho and is attempting to do this in lieu of listing this stock as an endangered species.

CRISSP Classes

(click on the links below for more information)

Fish 424: Fish Health Management

Fish 422: Concepts in Aquaculture

Fish 494: Seminar: Current Issues in Fish Health

 August 7, 2012
Aug 072012
 

Cort AndersonResearch Assistant Professor of Conservation Genetics
Laboratory Manager
Laboratory for Ecological, Evolutionary, and Conservation Genetics
Wildlife Resources
CRISSP Co-Director

 

(208) 885-8914
cla@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Cort Anderson received a BA in Biology from the University of Chicago and a PhD in Biology from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Cort’s research is focused on molecular genetics and evolution specific to conservation and invasion biology. He is the manager for the Laboratory for Conservation and Ecological Genetics where he provides assistance and advice to students and faculty. more info

CRISSP Classes

Invasion Biology

Collaborations

Aquatic Invasive Species Taskforce
Idaho Invasive Species Council

 August 7, 2012