UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations University of Idaho College of Natural Resources University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Image Map
Aug 082012
 

Kerry ReeseProfessor of Avian Biology
Department Head, Ecology and Conservation Biology
Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-6434
kreese@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. Kerry Reese received a BS in Biology from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a MS in Wildlife from Clemson University, and a PhD in Wildlife from Utah State University. His research is focused on upland game bird ecology and management, nongame wildlife, and avian habitat relationships. Kerry’s current projects are focused on the population dynamics of the Sage Grouse. more info

CRISSP Classes

(click on the link below for more information)

Wlf 492: Wildlife Management

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Janet RachlowAssociate Professor of Wildlife Ecology
Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-9328
jrachlow@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Janet Rachlow received a BA in Biology from the University of Iowa, an MS in Wildlife Management from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Nevada Reno. Janet’s research is focused on mammalian ecology and conservation. More specifically, Janet and her students focus on relationships between animals and their habitats, especially in changing environments. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

George NewcombeAssociate Professor of Forest Pathology
Ecology & Conservation Biology
Forest Resources

(208) 885-5289
georgen@uidaho.edu

Biography

Dr. George Newcombe received a BS in Plant Science from McGill University in 1983 and a PhD in Botany from the University of Guelph in 1988. George’s research encompasses plant and forest pathology, and invasion biology. Specifically, his group is interested in the roles of fungi in plant communities. Photo in Beijing, September 2007, for the International Workshop on Biological Control of Invasive Species of Forest [Photo courtesy of Yilmaz Balci, University of Maryland]. more info

CRISSP Research
  1. Diagnosis of fungi that are new to North America or to the region. In 1992, George discovered for the first time in North America the Eurasian poplar leaf rust fungus, Melampsora larici-populina (Newcombe and Chastagner 1993). Since then, he has been a regular contributor to this element of invasion biology.
  2. Research on fungi that might protect native trees from exotic pathogens. With Beccy Ganley, a former PhD student, and Richard Sniezko, a colleague in the Forest Service, George discovered that selected endophytes might protect western white pine trees from the exotic disease, white pine blister rust. George and Richard are now using the same approach to see if endophyte inoculations of outplanted seedlings could make the difference in whitebark pine restoration. George is also attempting to use endophytes to protect hybrid popular plantations.
  3. Research on fungi that might be used against invasive plants. George has been researching selected endophytes that might work against invasive plants such as spotted knapweed, meadow hawkweed, and cheatgrass.
  4. Research on genes for resistance to exotic pathogens of plants. George has been conducting research in this area since getting involved in hybrid poplar research in 1991.
CRISSP Classes

FOR 531: Invasion Biology (for graduate students)
FOR 468: Forest and Plant Pathology (for senior undergraduate students)

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Charles HarrisProfessor of Environmental Management, Policy and Planning
Conservation Social Sciences

(208) 885-6314
charris@uidaho.edu

 

 

Biography

Dr. “Chuck” Harris received a BA in English Literature from Oberlin College, a MA in Natural Resource Management from Colorado State University and a PhD in Natural Reources from the University of Michigan. Chuck has been at the University of Idaho for over 20 years, where he has taught and conducted research on a wide variety of topics, including: the human dimensions of ecosystem management and restoration ecology; the impacts of resource management activities and policies on rural communities; social impact assessment and deliberative public input processes; resource management, policy, and planning; the organizational psychology of resource management; and natural resource tourism, impacts, and market analysis. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Edward GartonProfessor of Population Ecology
Fish & Wildlife Resources

(208) 885-7426
ogarton@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. Edward Garton received a BA in Biology from Sanford University, and a MS and PhD in Ecology from the University of California, Davis. Edward’s research is focused on the dynamics and Management of Bird and Mammal Populations. Some of his research includes the impacts of the reintroduction of wolves on Yellowstone elk and deer populations, population ecology of Greater Sage Grouse and Trumpeter Swans, aerial census methods for elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and moose populations, bird predation on forest insect pests, and home range estimation. more info

 August 8, 2012