UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations UI Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations University of Idaho College of Natural Resources University of Idaho College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Image Map
Aug 082012
 

John "Jack" SullivanAssociate Professor of Systematic Biology
Biological Sciences

(208) 885-9049
jacks@uidaho.edu

 

Biography

Dr. “Jack” Sullivan received a PhD from the University of Conneticut. Jack’s research is focused on theoretical systematics and empirical rodent systematics. The three current major research foci in his lab are:

  • The application of decision theory to phylogeny estimation.
  • Ecosystem evolution, with particular emphasis on the mesic forest ecosystem in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Testing divergence with gene flow in speciation of western chipmunks (Tamias).

more info

CRISSP Research

The centrality of evolutionary biology to all aspects of life sciences, including ecology and conservation, has never been clearer. My research program integrates empirical and theoretic studies in several sub disciplines within evolutionary biology. This approach is synergistic; my research in phylogenetic theory greatly enhances my empirical research, whereas my empirical research focuses my theory research toward practical solutions to difficult problems in phylogeny estimation. Furthermore, this focus on both empirical and theoretical research encourages interdisciplinary collaboration, which I find extremely rewarding and which is central to my research.

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

Steve NovakAssociate Professor of Population Ecology
Biological Sciences
Boise State University

 

208-426-3548
snovak@boisestate.edu

Biography

Dr. Steve Novak received a BS in Environmental Science from Johnson State College, a MS in Plant Pathology from the University of Massachusetts, and a PhD in Botany from Washington State University. Steve’s research is focus on plant population ecology and evolutionary biology; investigations of the factors that influence the level and structure of genetic variation: introduction events, founder effects, gene flow, and mating systems; polyploid speciation and ecological consequences of polyploidy. more info

 August 8, 2012
Aug 082012
 

John GaskinPest Management Research Unit Research Leader and Scientist
USDA Agricultural Research Service

 

(406) 433.9444
john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov

Biography

Dr. John Gaskin received a BS in Biology from University of California and a PhD in Evolutionary and Population Biology from Washington University in St. Louis and Missouri Botanical Gardens in Missouri. John’s research focuses on the systematics and population structure of invasive plants, particularly whitetop or hoarycress (Lepidium draba formerly Cardaria draba) and saltcedar (Tamarix spp.). The specific goals of this research are to are to find out which genotypes of these exotic plants are invading, where the genotypes originated from in Eurasia, which native and exotic species they are most closely related to, and where the invasive genotypes are distributed in the U.S. This information will be used to insure that all of the genetic diversity of these invasions will be present in tests of current and proposed biological control agents, and that all native plants closely related to the invasion will be included in host-specificity tests. more info

 August 8, 2012