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Aug 132012
 

Plant Problem (Symptoms) Pathogen Insect Physiological Notes
Plant stunted, weak growth, leaves off color or limbs dying Powdery mildew (white powdery fungus on leaves), rusts (red, black or orange spots on leaves), leaf spot (black spots on leaves borer damage to stem or leaves, look for holes in stems or leaves Poor soil drainage, drought damage, excess soil drainage, planting too deeply, improper soil pH, cold damage, lawn mower damage, sunscald, stem breakage, animal damage Consider working organic matter into soil before planting shrubs or trees to help improve soil aeration and water-holding capacity. Lack of water is the primary cause of death to recently transplanted shrubs and trees
Plants dying suddenly Root rots (fungus) Insect larva attacking roots Over fertilizing, severe drought damage, poor soil preparation When root rot damage is moderate, symptoms may be similar to those of drought damage
Yellowing (chlorosis) Viruses may cause a mottled appearance on the leaves Insect damage to stem or stippling of leaves Nutritional deficiency (N, Zn or Fe), poorly drained soil, over fertilization, mechanical damage to stem N deficiencies occur on lower leaves first and move up the plant. Fe deficiencies result in interveinal chlorosis of the upper leaves first.
Browning of margin or edges of leaves Root rot (fungus) Frost or cold damage, drought damage, transplanting shock, poor soil drainage, excessive fertilization, mechanical damage Frost damage usually occurs in early spring as buds leaf out. Damage may not be visible for a month or more.
Plant fails to flower Bud blight and other fungal diseases of the flowers Aphids, thrips, grasshoppers, and other chewing or sucking insects Plant is too young or excessive vegetative growth over shading High N levels in soils and ideal growing conditions may delay flowering of some plants.
Plant fails to produce berries Fungal diseases at flowering Cold or frost during flowering, plant is a male or a male plant is missing with only female plants present, improper pruning Using hedge shears to prune shrubs usually results in the removal of most of the tip growth and future flower buds. Berry-producing plants are best pruned by removal of individual limbs inside the plant.
Loss of berries before maturity Fungus disease on berries insect larva Drought damage In mild to moderate attacks by floral diseases, the berries may be discolored or deformed.

Taken from: Perennial Ornamental Plants. H.S. Fenwick, Extension Plant Pathologist. University of Idaho College of Agriculture. Current information Series 146, 1977.


 August 13, 2012